Welcome to our Growing Space

French Beans

ie: Peas and Beans
Post Reply
User avatar
divingbrit
Site Admin
Posts: 270
Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2016 9:55 am
Location: Lincoln
Contact:

French Beans

Post by divingbrit » Thu Dec 29, 2016 6:28 pm

French Beans (Dwarf) NAUTICA

Sowing method
Seeds germinate in 14 days. Sow some beans every 3 weeks to give more than one harvest per season. There are 2 methods of sowing: 1. Sow directly in the garden, preferably in a sunny spot as soon as all danger of frost has passed, up to and including July. Loosen the soil in the bed with a fork to a depth of at least 30 cm. There should be no fresh manure in the soil and it should not be too cold or wet. Stretch some garden string between two canes at either end of the bed and drag a furrow along the length of the string. Throw five beans in a hole every 40 cm and cover with soil to a depth of 4 or 5 cm. Use the back of the rake to press lightly down and immediately sprinkle with water. Remove the string and use a marker to label the row. Rows should be 40 cm apart. 2. Sprouting seeds are very liable to frost damage. A good tip is to germinate indoors with the advantage that the birds can't get at them either. Sow in pots, March-April and fill the pots with good potting compost, 5 beans to a pot. Cover with a layer of potting compost to a maximum of 3 cm deep. Press lightly down and sprinkle with water. Stand the pots in a sunny place at room temperature. If the seedlings start to get too big before it is possible to plant out, gain some time by storing them in a cool room. Give the sprouts enough room to grow – keep the pots far enough apart that the leaves do not touch. Give each pot its own cane and tie the plants in as they grow. Plant out after all danger of frost has past, 5 plants (one pot) per cane or string, every 40 cm and rows also 40 cm apart. [attachment=0]French.jpg[/attachment]
Attachments
French.jpg
French.jpg (28.13 KiB) Viewed 155 times
Scuba diving is an art, not a sport

User avatar
divingbrit
Site Admin
Posts: 270
Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2016 9:55 am
Location: Lincoln
Contact:

Re: French Beans

Post by divingbrit » Fri Dec 30, 2016 11:35 am

Climbing French Beans 'Blue Lake'

French Bean 'Blue Lake' (Climbing) is a wonderfully prolific climbing bean (210cm), with a long, steady cropping pattern of tender and tasty green beans. It the slowest of any bean I grow to get tough and stringy. Many people's favourite.
This also produces a very pretty white flower, that looks lovely in a little vase on the kitchen table with some bright sweet peas.
French beans are almost always best on their own, in splendid isolation or mixed with other things. But, they need to be fresh – you can tell because they smell very clean and will snap in half sharply.
  • Genus Phaseolus vulgaris
    Variety Blue Lake
    Type Half-Hardy Annual
    Common Name Climbing French Bean, Green Bean
    Border Position Back
    Soil Type Neutral
    Site Full Sun
    Moisture Well-drained
    Height 2.1m (7ft)
Spacing Plant out seedlings (in late May) when they are 5cm tall, spacing them 25cm apart, against their support cane.
Sowing, Seeds, Planting Soak seed for half an hour before sowing. Sow under cover from April or direct sow outside (5cm deep) after the last frosts from mid May to July.

Care Tips Pinch out the tops once the plant has grown to 6ft in height. Support with canes.
Storing Save the flageolet beans inside to dry and use in stews. These also freeze well.
Harvesting From July - October. Best picked often and before you can see the bean seed shape inside, at about 10-12cm in length. This variety produces for a longer period than dwarf varieties.
Cooking Notes Do not eat the pods raw, as they contain harmful toxins. To cook, top and tail and place in boiling water, to cook until tender.
[attachment=0]bluelake.jpg[/attachment]
Attachments
bluelake.jpg
bluelake.jpg (122.99 KiB) Viewed 144 times
Scuba diving is an art, not a sport

Post Reply