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Chives

Sown in groups that need the same soil conditions
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divingbrit
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Chives

Post by divingbrit » Fri Dec 30, 2016 6:45 pm

Chives are incredibly easy to maintain. Keep plants well watered, especially during long dry spells in summer.
Rejuvenate congested clumps in the ground by lifting and dividing plants every three years or so.
Preferring moisture retentive, well-drained soil and a sunny or partially shaded position outdoors, chives form 30cm (1ft) tall clumps and can also be grown in pots of soil-based compost.
When plants have filled a container, either move into a slightly larger pot or lift the plant out and divide the rootball in two with a sharp knife, replanting a portion in the same pot.
Chives die back in late autumn. Keep plants looking tidy by clearing away debris.

Leek rust: This is a fungal disease causing bright yellow spots on the leaves. It is often worse in long, wet spells.
Remedy: Mild attacks of rust won’t harm the plant, but serious infections may cause leaves to shrivel and affect yield. There is no control for rust once you have the infection. Make sure you don’t crowd plants, as this increases humidity and increases the likelihood of infection. Dispose of any badly affected plant material, and don’t grow garlic, leeks or onions in the same spot for three years.

Harvesting

To keep plants productive, remove flowers as they start to fade or use the young blooms to brighten up salads. Cut leaves as required with scissors, snipping close to the base of plants – the more often they’re cut, the more new leaves will be produced.

Chives are best used fresh, although they can be cut up finely, packed into an ice-cube tray half-filled with water and popped into the freezer. Pop out cubes whenever you need them. [attachment=0]chives.jpg[/attachment]
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